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EARLY LIFE HEALTH INTERVENTIONS AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Prashant Bharadwaj (), Katrine Løken () and Christopher Neilson ()
Additional contact information
Prashant Bharadwaj: Economics, UC San Diego, http://cega.berkeley.edu/

No 13/12, Working Papers in Economics from University of Bergen, Department of Economics

Abstract: This paper studies the effect of improved neonatal health care on mortality and long run academic achievement in school. We use the idea that medical treatments often follow rules of thumb for assigning care to patients, such as the classification of Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW), which assigns infants special care at a specific birth weight cutoff. Using detailed administrative data on schooling and birth records from Chile and Norway, we establish that children who receive extra medical care at birth have lower mortality rates and higher test scores and grades in school. These gains are in the order of 0.15-0.22 standard deviations.

Keywords: Very low birth weight; academic achievement; regression discontinuity (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I11 I38 J13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 71 pages
Date: 2012-07-24
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dem and nep-ure
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http://ekstern.filer.uib.no/svf/2012/WP13.12.pdf Full text (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Early Life Health Interventions and Academic Achievement (2013) Downloads
Working Paper: Early Life Health Interventions and Academic Achievement (2012) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:hhs:bergec:2012_013

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