EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Financial Sector Policies, Poverty and Inequality

Anders Johansson () and Xun Wang ()
Additional contact information
Xun Wang: China Economic Research Center, Postal: Stockholm School of Economics, P.O. Box 6501, SE-113 83 Stockholm, Sweden

No 2012-24, Working Paper Series from Stockholm School of Economics, China Economic Research Center

Abstract: While finance has been shown to influence the distribution of income, little research has been devoted to the potential impact of financial sector policies on inequality. This study analyzes the relationship between financial repression and inequality across countries and across China's provinces. Using several alternative estimation procedures including fixed effect, dynamic panel and instrumental variable regressions, we find that financial repression is positively associated with inequality across countries. Moreover, we find that this relationship is stronger in less developed economies and that interest rate controls, capital account controls, poor banking supervision and a concentrated banking sector are the most important financial policies influencing inequality. Furthermore, financial repression is associated with a higher fraction of the population living in poverty. Focusing on China, financial repression again acts as a driver for inequality and its effect is stronger in less developed provinces. These results have important policy implications, not the least so for China, where rising inequality poses a significant problem for the government.

Keywords: Income distribution; Poverty; Financial repression; Capital markets; China (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D31 G00 O11 O16 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 36 pages
Date: 2012-09-20
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-tra
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://swopec.hhs.se/hacerc/papers/hacerc2012-024.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:hhs:hacerc:2012-024

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Paper Series from Stockholm School of Economics, China Economic Research Center China Economic Research Center, Stockholm School of Economics, P.O. Box 6501, 113 83 Stockholm, Sweden. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Malin Nilsson ( this e-mail address is bad, please contact ).

 
Page updated 2021-01-16
Handle: RePEc:hhs:hacerc:2012-024