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Why do Europeans Work so Little?

Conny Olovsson

No 727, Seminar Papers from Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies

Abstract: Market work per person is roughly 10 percent higher in the U.S. than in Sweden. However, if we include the work carried out in home production, the total amount of work only differs by 1 percent. I set up a model with home production, and show that differences in policy - mainly taxes – can account for the discrepancy in labor supply between Sweden and the U.S. Moreover, even though the elasticity of labor supply is rather low for individual households, labor taxes are estimated to be associated with considerable output losses. I also show that policy can account for the falling trend in market work in Sweden since 1960. The largest reduction occurs from 1960 until around 1980, both in the model and the data. After the early 1980s, the trends for both taxes and actual hours worked are basically flat. This is also true for hours worked in the model.

Keywords: Labor supply; Taxes; Home production (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D13 H24 J22 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 27 pages
Date: 2004-02-09
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-eec and nep-pbe
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Related works:
Journal Article: WHY DO EUROPEANS WORK SO LITTLE? (2009)
Working Paper: Why do Europeans Work so Little? (2004) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:hhs:iiessp:0727

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