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The Long-Term Effects of Forced Migration: An Early-Life Approach with Evidence from Yugoslavian Refugees in Sweden

Luis Serratos-Sotelo ()

No 228, Lund Papers in Economic History from Lund University, Department of Economic History

Abstract: This paper analyzes the effect of being exposed to forced migration during childhood (ages 0-5) on educational achievement at age 15 (grade 9). Using register data from the Swedish Interdisciplinary Panel, I identify children who migrated to Sweden as a consequence of the rising conflict during the disintegration of the former Yugoslavia, and follow them until age 15, when they received their grades at the end of the 9 years of compulsory education in Sweden. The results show that those who experienced forced migration performed worse in school, as measured by Math and Swedish grades and Merit Rating scores, with forced migrants achieving grades that were on average 5 (Merit Rating), 7 (Swedish), and 22 (Math) percentage points of a standard deviation lower than those of native Swedes. Forced migrants outperformed Swedes only in English, obtaining grades that were on average 12 percentage points of a standard deviation higher than did their native-born counterparts.

Keywords: forced migration; refugees; education; early-life; Sweden (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I24 J13 J15 N34 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 20 pages
Date: 2021-10-13
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dem, nep-eur, nep-his, nep-int, nep-mig and nep-ure
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