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Good Times Are Drinking Times: Empirical Evidence on Business Cycles an Alcohol Sales in Sweden 1861-2000

Niclas Krüger and Mikael Svensson

No 2008:2, Working Papers from Örebro University, School of Business

Abstract: This paper studies the relationship between the business cycle and alcohol sales in Sweden using a data set for the years 1861-2000. Using wavelet based band-pass filtering it is found that there is a pro-cyclical relationship, i.e. alcohol sales increases in short-term economic upturns. Using moving window techniques we see that the pro-cyclical relationship holds over the entire time period. We also find that alcohol sales are a long-memory process with non-stationary behavior, i.e. a shock in alcohol sales has persistent effects

Keywords: Businesscycles:Alcohol:Sweden (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: E32 I12 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 15 pages
Date: 2008-05-08
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cbe, nep-hea and nep-mac
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (4)

Forthcoming in Applied Economics Letters.

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Journal Article: Good times are drinking times: empirical evidence on business cycles and alcohol sales in Sweden 1861-2000 (2010) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:hhs:oruesi:2008_002

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