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Estimating Long-Term Consequences of Teenage Childbearing - An Examination of the Siblings Approach

Helena Holmlund

No 1/2004, Working Paper Series from Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research

Abstract: One of the remedies to selection bias in estimates of the labour market consequences of teenage motherhood has been to estimate within-family effects. A major critique, however, is that heterogeneity within the family might still bias the estimates. Using a large Swedish dataset on biological sisters, I revisit the question of the consequences of teenage motherhood. My contribution is that I am able to control for heterogeneity within the family; I use gradepoint-averages at age 16, a pre-motherhood characteristic that differs across sisters within the same family. My findings confirm the presumption that within-family heterogeneity can result in biased within-family estimates. Moreover, my results show that when controlling for school performance, the siblings approach and a traditional cross section yield similar coefficients.

Keywords: Fertility; sibling models (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea and nep-ure
Date: 2004-03-19
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