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A Quantification and Risk Analysis of Occupational Burns: Oregon Workers' Compensation Claims 1990-1997

Irwin B. Horwitz () and Brian McCall

Working Papers from Human Resources and Labor Studies, University of Minnesota (Twin Cities Campus)

Abstract: This study examined all accepted Oregon workers' compensation claims for occupational burn injuries over 1990-1997 (n = 3,158). The Current Population Survey (CPS) was used to derive employee population baselines for establishing rate estimates. It was estimated that the average occupational burn claim rate was 2.89 per 10,000 workers (95% C.I. = 2.76-3.02). The majority of claimants (71.7%) were males, the largest proportion (32.6%) were aged 25 years or under, and almost half (48.7%) had less than 1 year of job tenure. Costs averaged over $1.6 million annually. The average indemnity period was 16 days. Higher relative risks were found for evening workers (2.97, 95% C.I. = 2.96-2.98) and night workers (2.13, C.I. = 2.12-2.13) compared to day shift workers. Kitchen workers had the highest burn rate of all occupations with 62.5 per 10,000.

Keywords: burns; occupational burns; employee safety; Oregon; workers' compensation (search for similar items in EconPapers)
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