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Collaborating with People Like Me: Ethnic Coauthorship within the United States

Richard Freeman () and Wei Huang ()

Scholarly Articles from Harvard University Department of Economics

Abstract: By examining the ethnic identity of authors in over 2.5 million scientific papers written by US-based authors from 1985 to 2008, we find that persons of similar ethnicity coauthor together more frequently than predicted by their proportion among authors. The greater homophily is associated with publication in lower-impact journals and with fewer citations. Meanwhile, papers with authors in more locations and with longer reference lists get published in higher-impact journals and receive more citations. These findings suggest that diversity in inputs by author ethnicity, location, and references leads to greater contributions to science as measured by impact factors and citations.

Date: 2015
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-sog
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Published in Journal of Labor Economics

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http://dash.harvard.edu/bitstream/handle/1/2045399 ... inal-MS_Sept2014.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Collaborating with People Like Me: Ethnic Coauthorship within the United States (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: Collaborating with People Like Me: Ethnic Coauthorship within the United States (2014) Downloads
Chapter: Collaborating with People Like Me: Ethnic Coauthorship within the United States (2012)
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