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Sticky Information Versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve

N. Gregory Mankiw () and Ricardo Reis

Scholarly Articles from Harvard University Department of Economics

Abstract: This paper examines a model of dynamic price adjustment based on the assumption that information disseminates slowly throughout the population. Compared with the commonly used sticky-price model, this sticky-information model displays three related properties that are more consistent with accepted views about the effects of monetary policy. First, disinflations are always contractionary (although announced disinflations are less contractionary than surprise ones). Second, monetary policy shocks have their maximum impact on inflation with a substantial delay. Third, the change in inflation is positively correlated with the level of economic activity.

Date: 2002
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Published in Quarterly Journal of Economics -Cambridge Massachusetts-

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Journal Article: Sticky Information versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve (2002) Downloads
Journal Article: Sticky information versus sticky prices: a proposal to replace the New-Keynesian Phillips curve (2001) Downloads
Working Paper: Sticky Information Versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve (2001) Downloads
Working Paper: Sticky Information Versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve (2001) Downloads
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