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The Challenges of Democratizing News and Information: Examining Data on Social Media, Viral Patterns and Digital Influence

John P Wihbey

Scholarly Articles from Harvard Kennedy School of Government

Abstract: The advent of social media and peer-to-peer technologies offers the possibility of driving the full democratization of news and information, undercutting the agenda-setting of large media outlets and their relative control of news and information flows. We are now about a decade into the era of the social Web. What do the data indicate about changing news flows and access/consumption patterns in the United States? Are we witnessing a paradigm shift yet, or are legacy patterns reasserting themselves? This paper brings together media industry data and perspective—from NPR, the Boston Globe and the Wall Street Journal—with a growing body of social science and computational research produced by universities and firms such as Microsoft Research and the Facebook data science team, as well as survey findings from the Pew Research Center. The bulk of the evidence so far complicates any easy narrative, and it very much remains an open question if we can expect a more radically democratized media ecosystem, despite promising early trends and anecdotes. As I review the evidence, I aim to highlight lessons and insights that can help those thinking about and operating in the social media space. This paper also aims to serve as an accessible survey of news media-related topics within social science and social network analysis scholarship.

Date: 2014
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cbe, nep-cdm, nep-hme and nep-soc
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Citations: View citations in EconPapers (2)

Published in Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy Discussion Paper Series

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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:hrv:hksfac:12872220

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