EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

How Does a Worker's Labour Market History Affect Job Duration?

Jeff Borland () and David Johnston ()

Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series from Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne

Abstract: This study explores the relation between a worker's job duration and prior labour market experience. Hazard models are estimated using data on employment spells for the population aged 25 to 64 years in Australia from the HILDA survey (waves 1 to 7). A worker's labour force state immediately preceding an employment spell is found to have a significant effect on the likelihood of exit from employment, as well as the exit destination and whether the exit is involuntary. In particular, previously being unemployed or having experienced involuntary separation from a job is associated with worse subsequent employment outcomes. To develop further insights into the role of labour market history a hazard model for exit from unemployment is also estimated, and the results contrasted with those from the employment model.

Keywords: unemployment; job tenure; hazard rate (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J20 J60 J64 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 30 pages
Date: 2010-06
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-lab
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (2) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads ... series/wp2010n06.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2010n06

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series from Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 Australia. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Sheri Carnegie ().

 
Page updated 2021-10-17
Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2010n06