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The Effects of Taxation on Migration: Some Evidence for the ASEAN and APEC Economies

Edda Claus (), Iris Claus () and Michael Dörsam
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Michael Dörsam: Universität Mainz

Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series from Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne

Abstract: This paper investigates the effects of taxation on migration. It develops a stylized, two country model to examine the impact of taxation on labor mobility. The theoretical prediction that taxation affects migration decisions is supported by some empirical evidence for the ASEAN and APEC economies. Average tax rates are found to have a larger impact on migration choices than marginal rates. Moreover, the results suggest that educated migrants are more responsive to taxation than migrants with no education. Average tax rates are most important for migrants with secondary education, while marginal rates have a greater influence on the decisions of migrants with tertiary education than secondary educated migrants. The finding that taxation affects migration decisions, in particular of educated migrants, has important policy implications.

Keywords: International migration; taxation (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: F22 H24 H31 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 31 pages
Date: 2010-12
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-acc, nep-mig and nep-pbe
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http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads ... series/wp2010n19.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Effects of Taxation on Migration: Some Evidence for the ASEAN and APEC Economies (2011)
Working Paper: The effects of taxation on migration: Some evidence for the ASEAN and APEC economies (2010) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2010n19

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