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Improving the Employment Rates of People with Disabilities through Vocational Education

Kostas Mavromaras and Cain Polidano ()

Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series from Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne

Abstract: During the 2001-8 period, the employment rate of people with a disability remained remarkably low in most western economies, hardly responding to better macroeconomic conditions and favourable anti-discrimination legislation and interventions. Continuing health and productivity improvements in the general population are leaving people with disabilities behind, unable to play their role and have their share in the increasing productive capacity of the economy. This paper combines dynamic panel econometric estimation with longitudinal data from Australia to show that vocational education has a considerable and long lasting positive effect on the employment participation and productivity of people with disabilities.

Keywords: Employment; disabilities; productivity; vocational training; dynamic panel regression (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J14 I19 I29 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dem and nep-lab
Date: 2011-03
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2011n03

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