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The Stability of Big-Five Personality Traits

Deborah Cobb-Clark and Stefanie Schurer

Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series from Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne

Abstract: We use a large, nationally-representative sample of working-age adults to demonstrate that personality (as measured by the Big Five) is stable over a four-year period. Average personality changes are small and do not vary substantially across age groups. Intra-individual personality change is generally unrelated to experiencing adverse life events and is unlikely to be economically meaningful. Like other non-cognitive traits, personality can be modeled as a stable input into many economic decisions.

Keywords: Non-cognitive skills; Big-Five personality traits; stability (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: C18 J24 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 13 pages
Date: 2011-08
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-evo, nep-lma and nep-neu
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (51)

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http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads ... series/wp2011n21.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: The stability of big-five personality traits (2012) Downloads
Working Paper: The Stability of Big-Five Personality Traits (2011) Downloads
Working Paper: The stability of big-five personality traits (2011) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2011n21

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