EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Did the 2007 Welfare Reforms for Low Income Parents in Australia Increase Welfare Exits?

King Fok and Duncan McVicar ()

Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series from Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne

Abstract: This paper examines the impacts of recent Australian welfare to work reforms for low income parents of school-aged children who had been in receipt of Parenting Payment for at least one year. Specifically, the reforms introduced a requirement to engage in at least 15 hours of work-related activity per week from the youngest child’s seventh birthday. We find large positive impacts on the hazard rates for exiting welfare and for switching between welfare payments. As a consequence, over the first year of the new regime the Parenting Payment caseload for the parents in this cohort with a youngest child aged 6 at the start of the year fell by 23.5%; without activation we estimate it would have fallen by 18.5%. The reforms also offer a rare opportunity to compare impacts on single and partnered parents, with partnered parents shown to be more responsive.

Keywords: Welfare reform; welfare to work; activation; lone parents; labour supply; Australia (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I38 J22 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 41 pages
Date: 2012-01
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads ... series/wp2012n01.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Did the 2007 welfare reforms for low income parents in Australia increase welfare exits? (2013) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2012n01

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series from Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 Australia. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Sheri Carnegie ().

 
Page updated 2021-04-07
Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2012n01