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On the Origins of the Worldwide Surge in Patenting: An Industry Perspective on the R&D-Patent Relationship

Jérôme Danguy (), Gaetan de Rassenfosse and Bruno van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie

Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series from Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne

Abstract: This paper decomposes the R&D-patent relationship at the industry level to shed light on the sources of the worldwide surge in patent applications. The empirical analysis is based on a unique dataset that includes 5 patent indicators computed for 18 industries in 19 countries covering the period from 1987 to 2005. The analysis shows that variations in patent applications reflect not only variations in research productivity but also variations in the appropriability and filing strategies adopted by firms. The results also suggest that the patent explosion observed in several patent offices can be attributed to the greater globalization of intellectual property rights rather than to a surge in research productivity.

Keywords: Appropriability; complexity; patent explosion; propensity to patent; research productivity; strategic patenting (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: O30 O34 O38 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-com, nep-eff, nep-ino, nep-ipr, nep-pr~ and nep-tid
Date: 2013-04
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Journal Article: On the origins of the worldwide surge in patenting: an industry perspective on the R&D–patent relationship (2014) Downloads
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