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The economic consequences of being left-handed: some sinister results

Kevin Denny () and Vincent O'Sullivan
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Vincent O'Sullivan: Institute for Fiscal Studies

No W06/07, IFS Working Papers from Institute for Fiscal Studies

Abstract: This paper provides the first estimates of the effects of handedness on hourly earnings. Augmenting a conventional earnings equation with an indicator of left handedness shows there is a well determined positive effect on male earnings with non-manual workers enjoying a slightly larger premium. These results are inconsistent with the view that left-handers in general are in some sense handicapped either innately or through experiencing a world geared towards right-handers. The results for females however reveal the opposite, left-handed females are paid significantly less. This is consistent with some psychological evidence which suggests that left-hander males have particular talents such as enhanced creativity and some evidence on brain morphology which also suggests advantages for left-handed males.

Keywords: Earnings; brain; left-handed; laterality (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2006-03-28
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http://www.ifs.org.uk/wps/wp0607.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: The Economic Consequences of Being Left-Handed: Some Sinister Results (2007) Downloads
Working Paper: The economic consequences of being left-handed: some sinister results (2004) Downloads
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