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Heckscher-Ohlin Theory and Individual Attitudes Towards Globalization

Kevin O'Rourke ()

The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series from IIIS

Abstract: The aim of the paper is to see whether individuals’ attitudes towards globalization are consistent with the predictions of Heckscher-Ohlin theory. The theory predicts that the impact of being skilled or unskilled on attitudes towards trade and immigration should depend on a country’s skill endowments, with the skilled being less anti-trade and antiimmigration in more skill-abundant countries (here taken to be richer countries) than in more unskilled-labour-abundant countries (here taken to be poorer countries). These predictions are confirmed, using survey data for 24 countries. The high-skilled are pro-globalization in rich countries; while in some of the very poorest countries in the sample being high-skilled has a negative (if statistically insignificant) impact on pro-globalization sentiment. More generally, an interaction term between skills and GDP per capita has a negative impact in regressions explaining anti-globalization sentiment. Furthermore, individuals view protectionism and anti-immigrant policies as complements rather than as substitutes, as they would do in a simple Heckscher-Ohlin world

Keywords: globalization; attitudes; survey data; Hecksher-Ohlin theory. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-pol
Date: 2003-07-01
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Working Paper: Heckscher-Ohlin Theory and Individual Attitudes Towards Globalization (2003) Downloads
Working Paper: Heckscher-Ohlin Theory and Individual Attitudes Towards Globalization (2003) Downloads
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