EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Gender Differences in Inter Vivos Transfers

Abigail Loxton ()
Additional contact information
Abigail Loxton: Department of Economics Indiana University

No 2019-002, CAEPR Working Papers from Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Department of Economics, Indiana University Bloomington

Abstract: To what extent do parents exhibit preferential treatment for one gender with respect to financial gifts to children? Using the Health and Retirement Study from 1992-2014, I estimate differences in the frequency and magnitude of gifts to sons and daughters. Conditional on a transfer, there is no evidence of differences in amounts between sons and daughters. However parents give to daughters at higher rates. I explore potential mechanisms for this disparity: in particular, I address the altruism and exchange motives for inter vivos transfers. I find that the difference in giving rates is partially explained by higher expected rates of future care from daughters. Even after controlling for discrepancy in care-taking, income levels, and other observable characteristics, parents are still 10-20% more likely to give a transfer to their daughters. The discrepancy in giving rates is driven by unmarried children: once daughters marry they are less likely to receive a transfer.

Keywords: inter vivos transfers; gender differences; altruism; informal care (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D64 D15 J14 J16 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 25 pages
Date: 2019-02
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-age and nep-gen
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://caepr.indiana.edu/RePEc/inu/caeprp/CAEPR2019-002.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:inu:caeprp:2019002

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in CAEPR Working Papers from Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Department of Economics, Indiana University Bloomington Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research ().

 
Page updated 2020-10-23
Handle: RePEc:inu:caeprp:2019002