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Long-term Consequences of the Atomic Bombing in Hiroshima

Satoshi Shimizutani () and Hiroyuki Yamada

No 2018-007, Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series from Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University

Abstract: This paper examines long-term consequences of one of the most serious catastrophes ever inflicted on humankind: the atomic bombing that occurred in Hiroshima in 1945. While many victims died immediately or within a few years of the bombing, there were many negative effects on survivors in terms of both health and social/economic aspects that could last many years. Of these two life factors, health and social/economic aspects, the latter has largely been ignored by researchers. We investigate possible long-lasting effects using a new dataset covering the middle and older generations in Hiroshima some 60 years after the tragedy. Our empirical results show that Atomic Bomb Survivors did not necessarily suffer unfavorable life experiences in terms of the average marriage status or educational attainment but did experience significant disadvantages some aspects including the husband/wife combination of married couples, work status, mental health, and expectations for the future. Thus, survivors have suffered for many years after the catastrophe itself.

Keywords: social discrimination; atomic bomb; radiation exposure; Hiroshima (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: H12 I18 I31 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 30 pages
Date: 2018-05-25
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea, nep-his and nep-knm
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:keo:dpaper:2018-007

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