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Environmental Contaminants of Asiatic Deserts Ecosystems in relation to Plants Distribution and Structure

Kristina Toderich, Tsuneo Tsukatani (), Oleg Petukhov, Victor Gruthinov, Timur Khujanazarov and Elena Juylova
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Kristina Toderich: Department of Desert Ecology & Water Resources Research, Samarkand Division of Uzbek's Academy of Sciences
Oleg Petukhov: Department of Environments and Natural Protection, Navoi Mining Metallurgical Combinate
Victor Gruthinov: Department of Environments and Natural Protection, Navoi Mining Metallurgical Combinate
Timur Khujanazarov: Department of Desert Ecology & Water Resources Research, Samarkand Division of Uzbek's Academy of Sciences
Elena Juylova: Department of Desert Ecology & Water Resources Research, Samarkand Division of Uzbek's Academy of Sciences

No 629, KIER Working Papers from Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research

Abstract: The focus of this research is on the salt/metalliferous pollutants because of their extreme toxicity, carcinogenicity, wide distribution and slow biodegradation under the harsh arid/semiarid environments. The extent of pollution of surface water and plants by various contents of salts, traces of heavy metals is presented for different regions of Zerafshan River Basin and Kyzylkum Desert. Soils and water contaminated with cadmium, copper, lead, zinc, selenium, arsenic, molybdenum, manganese, chromium, various oxidizers (Mn, NO3-, Fe +3, Al +3, ClO3-), NH4 and organic pollutants show natural colonization by species that have strategies of avoidance or tolerance to salt/metal toxities. Mapping of plant colonists of salts/metal contaminated soils, seed reproduction and cellular structures of tolerant taxa named as metallohalophytes are examined in the light of present knowledge of such strategies. Electrolytic adsorption and in situ immobilization technologies for cleaning pollutants of mining contaminated soils and underground water are suggested. Phytoremediation technology in the present case may offer a cost-effective and ecologically sound alternative.

Keywords: ion/salt contents; ICP-MS; glandular structures; metallohalophytes; phytoremediation; contaminated ecosystem; Kyzylkum Desert. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 14pages
Date: 2007-02
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-env
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