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Calendar Anomalies in an Emerging African Market: Evidence from the Ghana Stock Exchange

Imhotep Alagidede () and Theodore Panagiotidis

Discussion Paper Series from Department of Economics, Loughborough University

Abstract: This paper investigates two calendar anomalies in an emerging African market. Both the day of the week and month of the year effects are examined for Ghana. The latter is an interesting case because i) it operates for only three days per week during the sample period and ii) the increased focus that African stock markets have received lately both from academics and practitioners. We employ rolling techniques to asses the affects of policy and institutional changes. This allows deviations from the linear paradigm. We finally employ non-linear models from the GARCH family in a rolling framework to investigate the role of asymmetries. Contrary to a January return pattern in most markets, an April effect is found for Ghana. The evidence also shows the presence of the day of the week effects with asymmetric volatility performing better than the benchmark linear estimates. This seasonality though disappears when only the latest information is used (time-varying asymmetric GARCH). Our approach provides a new framework for investigating this well-known puzzle in finance.

Keywords: Calendar Anomalies; Non-Linearity; Market Efficiency; Asymmetric Volatility; Rolling windows. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: C22 C52 G10 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2006-06, Revised 2006-06
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-afr, nep-agr, nep-fin, nep-fmk and nep-rmg
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (9)

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http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/ec/RePEc/lbo/lbowps/Ghana12062006.pdf

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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:lbo:lbowps:2006_13

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