EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Household technology acceptance heterogeneity in computer adoption

Alastair Robertson, Didier Soopramanien and Robert Fildes
Additional contact information
Alastair Robertson: Department of Management Science, Lancaster University Management School
Didier Soopramanien: Department of Management Science, Lancaster University Management School
Robert Fildes: Department of Management Science, Lancaster University Management School

No DMS/0710, Working Papers from Department of Management Science, Lancaster University

Abstract: Technology policy analysis and implementation relies on knowledge and understanding of the "adoption gap" in information technologies among different groups of consumers. Factors that explain the residential "digital divide" also need to be identified and quantified. Through the application of survey data we provide an enhanced understanding of the key factors involved in the choice of residential computer adoption. These choices are analysed using a discrete choice model that reveals that sociodemographic factors strongly influence the adoption of the residential computer. Moreover, we apply the basic findings of the Technology Adoption Model (TAM) into the discrete choice framework heteroscedastically to deepen our understanding of why some households choose not to have computers; above and beyond what may be explained by socio-demography alone. Generally, we find that computer adoption is sensitive to household digital division measures and that the model fit improves with the heteroscedastic addition of the TAM factors. These findings are important for market planners and policymakers who wish to understand and quantify the impact of these factors on the digital divide across different household types, as defined by the TAM model.

Keywords: technology; adoption (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: O3 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 12 pages
Date: 2007-10, Revised 2007-10
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

There are no downloads for this item, see the EconPapers FAQ for hints about obtaining it.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:lms:mansci:dms-0710

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from Department of Management Science, Lancaster University Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Joern Meissner (). This e-mail address is bad, please contact .

 
Page updated 2020-08-11
Handle: RePEc:lms:mansci:dms-0710