EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Is there Discrimination Against Women Entrepreneurs in Formal Credit Markets in Nigeria?

Emmanuel O. Nwosu, Anthony Orji (), Vivian Nwangwu and Chioma Nwangwu

Working Papers PMMA from PEP-PMMA

Abstract: This research investigates whether women entrepreneurs in small and medium-sized enterprise (SMEs) in Nigeria are marginalised in formal credit markets compared to their male counterparts. The study also investigates the impact of credit access on the performance of enterprises. The study uses Nigerian Enterprise Surveys data from 2010 to construct a direct measure of credit constraints in order to address the objectives. A probit credit constraint model was estimated, and nonlinear decomposition methods as well as propensity score matching methods were employed in the analyses. Our results did not show significant discrimination against women in formal credit markets in Nigeria. The results reveal that firms that are not credit constrained in the formal credit market perform measurably better in terms of output, output per worker and the decision to invest/expand, compared to firms that are constrained. Our results also show that access to formal credit by small and medium enterprises in Nigeria is still very low. The policy implications, among others, are that government and monetary authorities should support credit expansion policies for medium and small enterprises by creating an enabling environment for financial intermediation in Nigeria. Also, intervention funds targeted specifically at medium and micro enterprises would help to ease credit constraints.

Keywords: gender; discrimination; credit; constraint; performance; access (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: O16 O17 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-afr, nep-ent, nep-hme and nep-mfd
Date: 2015
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://portal.pep-net.org/documents/download/id/24277 (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:lvl:pmmacr:2015-01

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers PMMA from PEP-PMMA Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Manuel Paradis ().

 
Page updated 2020-01-17
Handle: RePEc:lvl:pmmacr:2015-01