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The FDI-growth nexus in South Africa: A re-examination using quantile regression approach

Hlalefang Khobai, Nicolene Hamman (), Thando Mkhombo, Simbarashe Mhaka (), Nomahlubi Mavikela () and Andrew Phiri ()
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Nicolene Hamman: Department of Economics, Nelson Mandela University

No 1703, Working Papers from Department of Economics, Nelson Mandela University

Abstract: This study sought to contribute to the growing empirical literature by investigating the effects of FDI on per capita GDP growth for South Africa using time series data collected between 1970 and 2016. In differing from a majority of previous studies we use quantile regressions which investigates the effects of FDI on economic growth at different distributional quantiles. Puzzling enough, our empirical results show that FDI has a negative influence on welfare at extremely low quantiles whereas at other levels this effect turns insignificant. Contrary, the effects of domestic investment on welfare is positive and significant at all levels. Collectively, these result have important implications for policymakers in South Africa.

Keywords: FDI; Economic growth; Quantile regression; Global financial crisis; South Africa. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: C21 E31 E22 F43 O40 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 35 pages
Date: 2017-07, Revised 2017-07
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-int and nep-mac
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http://repec.mandela.ac.za/RePEc/mnd/wpaper/paper.1703.pdf First version, 2017 (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: The FDI-Growth Nexus in South Africa: A Re-Examination Using Quantile Regression Approach (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: The FDI-growth nexus in South Africa: A re-examination using quantile regression approach (2017) Downloads
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