EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Role of Gender in Employment Polarization

Fabio Cerina (), Alessio Moro and Michelle Rendall

No 09-20, Monash Economics Working Papers from Monash University, Department of Economics

Abstract: We document that U.S. employment polarization in the 1980-2017 period is largely generated by women. In addition, we provide evidence that the increase of employ- ment shares at the bottom of the skill distribution are generated in market sectors producing services representing home production substitutes. We then show that a canonical model of skill-biased technological change augmented with a gender dimen- sion, an endogenous market/home labor choice and a two-sector market environment accounts well for gender, sectoral and overall employment polarization. Counterfactual experiments suggest that without the large increase in the skill premium of high-skilled women, employment polarization would have been substantially reduced, and changes of employment shares at the bottom of the distribution would have been negative.

Keywords: Employment Polarization; Gender; Skill Premium; Home Production. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: E20 E21 J16 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 52 pages
Date: 2020-12
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-mac
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.monash.edu/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005 ... arization_gender.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: The Role of Gender in Employment Polarization (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: The role of gender in employment polarization (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: The role of gender in employment polarization (2017) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:mos:moswps:2020-09

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.buseco.mo ... eco/research/papers/

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Monash Economics Working Papers from Monash University, Department of Economics Department of Economics, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Simon Angus ().

 
Page updated 2021-07-15
Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2020-09