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God and the Global Economy: Religion and Attitudes Toward Trade and Immigration in the United States

Joseph Daniels and Marc von der Ruhr ()

No 501, Working Papers and Research from Marquette University, Center for Global and Economic Studies and Department of Economics

Abstract: Using the results of a national identity survey, we test the impact of religious affiliation on trade and immigration-policy preferences of U.S. residents while controlling for individual level of skill, political ideology, and other important demographic characteristics. Our results show that religion is an important determinant of international-policy preferences as individuals who are pre-Vatican II Catholic or members of fundamentalist Protestant are more likely to prefer policies that restrict imports and immigration. Religiosity, in contrast, has a seperate effect on moderating attitudes toward immigration. In addition, we find evidence of denominational effects among African Americans in that members of fundamentalist denominations tend to favor policies that restrict imports while others do not, implying that statistical results commonly attributed to racial effects may actually be a religious effect.

JEL-codes: F0 H0 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 27 pages
Date: 2005-01
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-pol
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Published in the Socio-Economic Review, Vol 3, 2005, pages 467-489

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http://www.busadm.mu.edu/mrq/workingpapers/wpaper0501.pdf First version, 2005 (application/pdf)

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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:mrq:wpaper:0501

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