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Fertility, Household’s size and Poverty in Nepal

François Libois and Vincent Somville

No 1412, Working Papers from University of Namur, Department of Economics

Abstract: Population control policies keep on attracting massive attention: having more children would directly contribute to household’s poverty.Using household level data from Nepal, we investigate the links between household’s fertility decisions and variations in their size and composition. We show that household size barely changes with additional births but household composition is affected. Couples with fewer children host, on average, more other relatives. This result implies that fertility of a household has an ambiguous impact on its per capita consumption which depends on the relative gains in lower consumption versus costs of a lower income. We use the gender of the first born child to instrument the total number of consecutive children and identify the causal relationship.

Keywords: Nepal; Household size; Household composition; Poverty; Fertility (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I31 J13 D13 O53 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 55 pages
Date: 2014-10
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dev
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Downloads: (external link)
http://www.fundp.ac.be/eco/economie/recherche/wpseries/wp/1412.pdf First version, 2014 (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Fertility, household size and poverty in Nepal (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: Fertility, household size and poverty in Nepal (2018)
Working Paper: Fertility, household size and poverty in Nepal (2018)
Working Paper: Fertility, Household Size and Poverty in Nepal (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Fertility, Household Size and Poverty in Nepal (2017) Downloads
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