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How Can Micro and Small Enterprises in Sub-Saharan Africa Become More Productive? The Impacts of Experimental Basic Managerial Training

Yukichi Mano (), Alhassan Iddrisu, Yutaka Yoshino () and Tetsushi Sonobe ()
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Alhassan Iddrisu: The Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning, Ghana

No 11-06, GRIPS Discussion Papers from National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies

Abstract: The vast majority of micro and small enterprises (MSEs) in developing countries are located in industrial clusters, and the majority of such clusters have yet to see their growth take off. The performance of MSE clusters is especially low in Sub-Saharan Africa. While existing studies often attribute the poor performance to factors outside firms, problems within firms are seldom scrutinized. In fact, entrepreneurs in these clusters are unfamiliar with standard business practices. Based on a randomized experiment in Ghana, this study demonstrates that basic-level management training improves business practices and performance.

Keywords: Africa; Ghana; industrial development; survival clusters; management training; randomized experiment (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 38 pages
Date: 2011-07
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-afr, nep-cse, nep-ent and nep-sbm
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Related works:
Journal Article: How Can Micro and Small Enterprises in Sub-Saharan Africa Become More Productive? The Impacts of Experimental Basic Managerial Training (2012) Downloads
Working Paper: How can micro and small enterprises in Sub-Saharan Africa become more productive? the impacts of experimental basic managerial training (2011) Downloads
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