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Wage Structure and Gender Earnings Differentials in China and India

Dainn Wie () and Jong-Wha Lee ()
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Dainn Wie: National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies

No 16-25, GRIPS Discussion Papers from National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies

Abstract: This study analyzes how changes in overall wage inequality and gender-specific factors affected the gender wage gap in Chinese and Indian urban labor markets in the 1990s and 2000s. Analysis of micro data present that contrasting evolutionary patterns in gender wage gap emerged over the period, showing a widened wage gap in China but a dramatically reduced gap in India. In both countries, female workers f increased skill levels contributed to reducing the gender wage gap. However, increases in observed prices of education and experience worked unfavorably for high-skilled women, counterbalancing their improvement in labor market qualifications. Decomposition analyses show that China fs widened gap was attributable to gender-specific factors such as deteriorated observable and unobservable labor market qualifications and increased discrimination, especially against low- and middle-skilled female workers. For India, gender-specific factors and relatively high wage gains of low- and middle-skilled workers reduced the male-female wage gap.

New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cna, nep-dem, nep-gen and nep-tra
Date: 2016-12
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Journal Article: Wage Structure and Gender Earnings Differentials in China and India (2017) Downloads
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