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On Peer Effects: Contagion of Pro- and Anti-Social Behavior and the Role of Social Cohesion

Eugen Dimant ()

No 2017-06, Discussion Papers from The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham

Abstract: Little is known about the underlying mechanisms of behavioral contagion, in particular with respect to differences in contagion of pro- versus anti-social behavior. Our principal contribution is the use of a novel experimental approach that enables us to analyze the contagion of behavior under varied levels of social distance to peers and differences in contagion of pro- and anti-social behavior. Anti-social behavior is found to be more contagious and social distance particularly drives the contagion of anti-social but not prosocial behavior. The results yield policy implications with regards to designing effective nudges and interventions to facilitate (reduce) pro- (anti-)social behavior, in both social and work environments.

Keywords: Anti-Social Behavior; Behavioral Contagion; Charitable Giving; Peer Effects (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-exp and nep-ure
Date: 2017-06
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https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/cedex/documents/paper ... on-paper-2018-04.pdf Revised Version 2018-04 (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Contagion of Pro- and Anti-Social Behavior Among Peers and the Role of Social Proximity (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: On Peer Effects: Contagion of Pro- and Anti-Social Behavior in Charitable Giving and The Role of Social Identity (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: On Peer Effects: Behavioral Contagion of (Un)Ethical Behavior and the Role of Social Identity (2015) Downloads
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