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Procedural Fairness in Economic and Social Choice: Evidence from a Survey of Voters

Paul Anand

No 27, Open Discussion Papers in Economics from The Open University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics

Abstract: The paper argues for the relevance of procedural justice to social choice and presents supporting evidence from primary data on voter attitudes. A preliminary section proposes and discusses five propositions that indicate the potential value and significance of processes for social choice. Section 3 considers evidence for what psychologists have called 'voice' and the extent to which control over, or representation in, a decision is compatible with other economic notions of fair process, like random choosing. Section 4 examines empirical evidence that sensitivity to process fairness may be a means of dealing with power inequalities between interacting agents. Section 5 goes on to examine evidence concerning treatment which in some way is threatening to a person's position as an agent. A brief concluding section summarizes and indicates avenues for future research.

Keywords: procedural fairness; empirical social choice; random choosing; regard; cheap talk (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: A13 D63 D72 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 28 pages
Date: 2000-12
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Published in Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 247-270, April

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