EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Movements, Moments, and the Eroding Antitrust Consensus

Michael Wolfe
Additional contact information
Michael Wolfe: Duke University School of Law

No k7axf, LawArXiv from Center for Open Science

Abstract: Timothy Wu’s book, The Curse of Bigness, offers a brief history on and critical perspective of antitrust law's development over the last century, calling for a return to a Brandeisian approach to the law. In this review-essay, I use Wu's text as a starting point to explore antitrust law’s current political moment. Tracing the dynamics at play in this debate and Wu’s role in it, I note areas underexplored in Wu’s text regarding the interplay of antitrust law with other forms of industrial regulation, highlighting in particular current difficulties in copyright law as one of the underlying tensions driving popular discontent with the major technology firms or “tech trusts.” I consider the continuing influence of Robert Bork’s The Antitrust Paradox, now more than forty years old, and how the current reform movement might execute a shift as lasting and substantial as the one Bork spearheaded with his book.

Date: 2019-07-11
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-com, nep-his and nep-hpe
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://osf.io/download/5d26940945253a001c3cc37b/

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:osf:lawarx:k7axf

DOI: 10.31219/osf.io/k7axf

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in LawArXiv from Center for Open Science
Bibliographic data for series maintained by OSF ().

 
Page updated 2020-01-26
Handle: RePEc:osf:lawarx:k7axf