EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Who Owns the Law? Why We Must Restore Public Ownership of Legal Publishing, 26 J. Intell. Prop. L. 205 (2019)

Leslie Street and David R. Hansen
Additional contact information
Leslie Street: Mercer University

No xnbcp, LawArXiv from Center for Open Science

Abstract: Each state has its own method for officially publishing the law. This article looks at the history of legal publishing for the fifty states before looking at how legal publishing even in moving to electronic publishing may not ensure public access to the law. The article addresses barriers to free access to the law in electronic publishing including copyright, contract law, and potentially, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. The article concludes with prescriptions for how different actors, including state governments, publishers, libraries, and others can ensure robust public access to the law moving forward.

Date: 2019-04-29
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-law
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://osf.io/download/5cc7063abbbd370019a156c7/

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:osf:lawarx:xnbcp

DOI: 10.31219/osf.io/xnbcp

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in LawArXiv from Center for Open Science
Bibliographic data for series maintained by OSF ().

 
Page updated 2020-01-21
Handle: RePEc:osf:lawarx:xnbcp