EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Gone with the Wind: International Migration

Amelia Aburn and Dennis Wesselbaum
Additional contact information
Amelia Aburn: Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

No 1708, Working Papers from University of Otago, Department of Economics

Abstract: This paper adds to the literature on the determinants of international migration. First, we offer a joint analysis of the driving forces of migration capturing year-to-year variations and long-run effects. Second, we analyze the dynamic response of migration to shocks to its determinants. We start by presenting a theoretical model that allows us to model migration as an augmented gravity equation. We then construct a rich panel data set with 16 destination and 198 origin countries between 1980 and 2014. Most importantly, we find that climate change is a more important driver than income and political freedom together. Our results imply that a large time dimension is key to understand the effects of climate change. We then estimate a panel vectorautoregressive model showing that the dynamic response of migration is very different across shocks to different driving forces. Our findings carry implications for national and international immigration policies.

Keywords: Climate Change; Determinants; Dynamic Effects; International Migration (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: F22 O15 Q54 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-env and nep-mig
Date: 2017-04, Revised 2017-04
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.otago.ac.nz/economics/otago642786.pdf First version, 2017 (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:otg:wpaper:1708

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from University of Otago, Department of Economics Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Janet Bryant ().

 
Page updated 2019-04-14
Handle: RePEc:otg:wpaper:1708