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War, Migration and the Origins of the Thai Sex Industry

Abel Brodeur, Warn Nuarpear Lekfuangfu () and Yanos Zylberberg ()

No 1706E, Working Papers from University of Ottawa, Department of Economics

Abstract: This paper analyzes the determinants behind the spatial distribution of the sex industry in Thailand. We relate the development of the sex industry to an early temporary demand shock, i.e., U.S. military presence during the Vietnam War. Comparing the surroundings of Thai military bases used by the U.S. army to districts close to unused Thai bases, we find that there are currently 5 times more commercial sex workers in districts near former U.S. bases. The development of the sex industry is also explained by a high price elasticity of supply due to female migration from regions affected by an agricultural crisis. Finally, we study a consequence induced by the large numbers of sex workers in few red-light districts: the HIV outbreak in the early 1990s.

Keywords: Persistence; Industry Location; Sex Industry; HIV/AIDS (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I28 J46 J47 N15 O17 O18 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 57 pages
Date: 2017
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-his, nep-lma, nep-mig and nep-sea
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
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Related works:
Journal Article: War, Migration and the Origins of the Thai Sex Industry (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: War, Migration and the Origins of the Thai Sex Industry (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: War, Migration and the Origins of the Thai Sex Industry (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: War, migration and the origins of the Thai sex industry (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: War, Migration and the Origins of the Thai Sex Industry (2017) Downloads
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