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Social Capital and Having a Regular Family Doctor: Evidence from Longitudinal Data

Hana Bataineh (), Rose Anne Devlin () and Vicky Barham ()
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Hana Bataineh: University of Ottawa, ON, Canada
Vicky Barham: University of Ottawa, ON, Canada

No 1806E, Working Papers from University of Ottawa, Department of Economics

Abstract: Evidence shows that access to a regular family doctor increases the likelihood of regular care; but about 15% of the Canadian population does not have access to a regular family doctor. We are the first to examine if the presence of individual social capital (e.g., tangible support, friends and family) increases the likelihood of having a regular family doctor. Using the Canadian National Population Health longitudinal survey (1994 to 2010) and a dynamic random effects model (with and without endogenous initial conditions) we find robust evidence of a statistically significant and positive causal relationship between social capital and the probability of having a regular family doctor. Since past access to a family doctor is a strong predictor of both current and future access, we show that social capital is much more important in helping individuals find a family doctor than for keeping one.

Keywords: Social Capital; Social Networks; Regular Family Doctor; National Population Health Survey. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I10 I12 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-soc
Date: 2018
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Journal Article: Social capital and having a regular family doctor: Evidence from longitudinal data (2019) Downloads
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