EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Spinning the Industrial Revolution

Jane Humphries and Benjamin Schneider

No _145, Oxford University Economic and Social History Series from University of Oxford, Department of Economics

Abstract: Abstract: The prevailing explanation for why the Industrial Revolution occurred first in Britain is Robert Allen’s (2009) ‘high†wage economy’ view, which claims that the high cost of labour relative to capital and fuel incentivized innovation and the adoption of new techniques. This paper presents new empirical evidence on hand spinning before the Industrial Revolution and demonstrates that there was no such ‘high†wage economy’ in spinning, a leading sector of industrialization. We quantify the working lives of frequently ignored female and child spinners who were crucial to the British textile industry in the Early Modern period with evidence of productivity and wages from the late sixteenth to the early nineteenth century. Our results show that spinning was a widespread, low†wage, low†productivity employment, in line with the Humphries (2013) view of the motivations for the factory system.

Keywords: Hand spinning; Womenʹs wages; Industrial Revolution; Textiles; Great Divergence; High Wage Economy interpretation of invention and innovation (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J24 J31 J42 J46 N13 N33 N63 O14 O31 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-his and nep-ino
Date: 2016-06-16
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/ (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:oxf:esohwp:_145

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Oxford University Economic and Social History Series from University of Oxford, Department of Economics Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Anne Pouliquen ().

 
Page updated 2018-09-16
Handle: RePEc:oxf:esohwp:_145