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China, Europe and the Great Divergence: A Study in Historical National Accounting, 980-1850

Stephen Broadberry (), Hanhui Guan and David Daokui Li

No _155, Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers from University of Oxford, Department of Economics

Abstract: Abstract Chinese GDP per capita fluctuated at a high level during the Northern Song and Ming dynasties before trending downwards during the Qing dynasty. China led the world in living standards during the Northern Song dynasty, but had fallen behind Italy by 1300. At this stage, it is possible that parts of China were still on a par with the richest parts of Europe, but by 1750 the gap was too large to be bridged by regional variation within China and the Great Divergence had already begun before the Industrial Revolution.

Keywords: GDP Per Capita; Economic Growth; Great Divergence; China; Europe (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: E10 N35 O10 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cna, nep-evo, nep-gro, nep-his, nep-knm and nep-mac
Date: 2017-04-24
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Related works:
Journal Article: China, Europe, and the Great Divergence: A Study in Historical National Accounting, 980–1850 (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: China, Europe and the Great Divergence: A Study in Historical National Accounting, 980-1850 (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: China, Europe and the great Divergence: A Study in Historical National Accounting, 980-1850 (2017) Downloads
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