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Vulnerability to asset-poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa

Damien Échevin ()

MPRA Paper from University Library of Munich, Germany

Abstract: This paper presents a methodology to measure vulnerability to asset-poverty. Using repeated cross-section data, age cohort decomposition techniques focusing on second-order moments can be used to identify and estimate the variance of shocks on assets and, therefore, the probability of being poor in the future. Estimates from the Ghana Living Standard Surveys show that expected asset-poverty is a reliable proxy for expected consumption-poverty. Applying the methodology to nine Demographic Health Surveys countries, urban areas are found to unambiguously dominate rural areas over the unidimensional distribution of expected future asset-wealth, as they also generally do over the bi-dimensional distribution of present asset-wealth and expected future asset-wealth.

Keywords: vulnerability; poverty; wealth; pseudo panel; stochastic dominance; Africa (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D31 D12 O15 O12 I32 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2011
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-afr and nep-dev
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Citations: View citations in EconPapers (5) Track citations by RSS feed

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