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Gender Stereotype in Academia: Evidence from Economics Job Market Rumors Forum

Alice Wu
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Alice Wu: Princeton University

Working Papers from Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing.

Abstract: This paper examines whether people in academia portray and judge women and men differently in everyday "conversations" that take place online. I combine methods from text mining, machine learning and econometrics to study the existence and extent of gender stereotyping on the Economics Job Market Rumors forum. I first design a propensity score model to infer the gender a post mainly refers to from text, and simultaneously identify the individual words with the strongest association with gender. The words selected provide a direct look into the gender stereotyped language on this forum. Through a topic analysis of the posts, I find that when women are under discussion, the discourse tends to become significantly less academic or professionally oriented, and more about personal information and physical appearance. Moreover, a panel data analysis reveals the state dependence between the content of posts within a thread. In particular, once women are mentioned in a thread, the topic is likely to shift from academic to personal. Finally, I restrict the analysis to discussions about specific economists, and find that high-profile female economists tend to receive more attention on EJMR than their male counterparts.

JEL-codes: J16 J23 M51 J71 I23 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017-09
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-big, nep-gen, nep-hme and nep-sog
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:pri:cheawb:2017-09

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