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Cognitive Development Among Young Children in Ecuador: The Roles of Wealth, Health and Parenting

Christina Paxson and Norbert Schady
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Christina Paxson: Princeton University

No 239, Working Papers from Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing.

Abstract: We examine the relationship between early cognitive development, socio-economic status (SES), child health, and parenting in a developing country. Using a sample of over 3000 preschool age children from Ecuador, we analyze determinants of children?s scores on a widely used test of language ability. Household socioeconomic characteristics, in particular wealth and parental education, are "protective" children from wealthier households and with more educated parents have higher scores. This is especially true for older children. Child health and parenting quality are associated with test scores, and account for a portion, although not the majority, of the association between SES and cognitive development.

Keywords: Ecuador (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I12 O12 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2005-03
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Related works:
Journal Article: Cognitive Development among Young Children in Ecuador: The Roles of Wealth, Health, and Parenting (2007) Downloads
Working Paper: Cognitive development among young children in Ecuador: the roles of wealth, health and parenting (2005) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:pri:cheawb:44

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