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Causes and Consequences of Early Life Health

Anne Case () and Christina Paxson
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Christina Paxson: Princeton University

No 1214, Working Papers from Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing.

Abstract: We examine the consequences of childhood health for economic and health outcomes in adulthood, using height as a marker of health in childhood. After reviewing previous evidence, we present a conceptual framework that highlights data limitations and methodological problems associated with the study of this topic. We present estimates of the associations between height and a range of outcomes, including schooling, employment, earnings, health and cognitive ability, using data collected from early to late adulthood on cohort members in five longitudinal data sets. We find height is uniformly associated with better economic, health and cognitive outcomes ? a result only partially explained by the higher average educational attainment of taller individuals. We then turn to the NLSY79 Children and Young Adult Survey to better understand what specific aspects of early childhood are captured by height. We find, even among maternal siblings, taller siblings score better on cognitive tests and progress through school more quickly. Part of the differences found between siblings arises from differences in their birth weights and lengths attributable to mother?s behaviors while pregnant. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that childhood health influences health and economic status throughout the life course.

Keywords: childhood health; economic status; height; wellbeing (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D1 I12 J13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2010-01
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https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwjFN4HbBrDBVm56a0taS1k1djQ/view

Related works:
Working Paper: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF EARLY-LIFE HEALTH (2011) Downloads
Journal Article: Causes and consequences of early-life health (2010) Downloads
Working Paper: Causes and Consequences of Early Life Health (2010) Downloads
Working Paper: Causes and Consequences of Early Life Health (2010) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:pri:cheawb:74

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