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Family Sponsorship and Late-Age Migration in Aging America: Revised and Expanded Estimates of Chained Migration

Stacie Carr and Marta Tienda
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Stacie Carr: Princeton University
Marta Tienda: Princeton University

No 1424, Working Papers from Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing.

Abstract: We use the Immigrants Admitted to the United States (micro-data) supplemented with special tabulations from the Department of Homeland Security to examine how family reunification impacts the age composition of new immigrant cohorts since 1980. We develop a family migration multiplier measure for the period 1981 to 2009 that improves on prior studies by including IRCA immigrants and relaxing unrealistic assumptions required by synthetic cohort measures. Results show that every 100 initiating immigrants admitted between 1981-85 sponsored an average of 260 family members; the comparable figure for initiating immigrants for the 1996-2000 cohort is 345 family members. Furthermore, the number of family migrants ages 50 and over rose from 44 to 74 per 100 initiating migrants. The discussion considers the health and welfare implications of late-age migration in a climate of growing fiscal restraint and an aging native population.

Keywords: immigration; family reunification; security; age; health (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D12 D63 I00 I32 J15 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2012-04
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:pri:cheawb:april2012

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