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Differential Fertility, Human Capital, and Development

Tom Vogl
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Tom Vogl: Princeton University and NBER

Working Papers from Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing.

Abstract: Using micro-data from 48 developing countries, I document a recent reversal in the income-fertility relationship and its aggregate implications. Before 1960, children from larger families had richer parents and obtained more education. By century’s end, both patterns had reversed. Consequently, income differentials in fertility historically raised average education but now reduce it. While the reversal is unrelated to changes in GDP, women’s work, sectoral composition, or health, half is attributable to rising aggregate education in the parents’ generation. The results support a model in which rising skill returns lowered the minimum income at which parents invest in education.

JEL-codes: E24 I25 J10 O10 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2013-07
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:pri:cheawb:july2013-2

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