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The Reach of The South African Child Support Grant: Evidence from KwaZulu-Natal

Anne Case (), Victoria Hosegood and Frances Lund
Additional contact information
Victoria Hosegood: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
Frances Lund: University of Natal, Durban and Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies

No 176, Working Papers from Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies.

Abstract: The end of apartheid in South Africa brought with it the need to reform one component of the system of social assistance for poorer people -- that dealing with support to women and children. Under the old regime, a State Maintenance Grant had been awarded by government to help mothers without partners support themselves and their children. The program originally "purposefully"excluded African women and, later, when it was opened to Africans living in some parts of the country, it continued largely to exclude those living outside of urban areas. In 1996 the new government moved to reconfigure this form of support, and in April 1998 started phasing out the State Maintenance Grant, replacing it with a means-tested Child Support Grant. This was to be awarded to the primary care givers of poor children under the age of seven.

Keywords: South; Africa (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: H53 I38 J13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2003-12
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:pri:rpdevs:224

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