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Early-Life Health and Adult Circumstance in Developing Countries

Janet Currie () and Tom Vogl
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Tom Vogl: Princeton University

No 1454, Working Papers from Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies.

Abstract: A growing literature documents the links between long-term outcomes and health in the fetal period, infancy, and early childhood. Much of this literature focuses on rich countries, but researchers are increasingly taking advantage of new sources of data and identification to study the long reach of childhood health in developing countries. Health in early life may be a more significant determinant of adult outcomes in these countries because health insults are more frequent, the capacity to remediate is more limited, and multiple shocks may interact. However, the underlying relationships may also be more difficult to measure, given significant mortality selection. We survey recent evidence on the adult correlates of early-life health and the longterm effects of shocks due to disease, famine, malnutrition, pollution, and war.

Keywords: health; children; war; disease; links (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D19 D60 I00 I32 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2012-08
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Related works:
Journal Article: Early-Life Health and Adult Circumstance in Developing Countries (2013) Downloads
Working Paper: Early-Life Health and Adult Circumstance in Developing Countries (2012) Downloads
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