EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Has HIV/AIDS displaced other health funding priorities? Evidence from a new dataset of development aid for health

Grace Lordan ()
Authors registered in the RePEc Author Service: Fabrizio Carmignani ()

No 422, Discussion Papers Series from University of Queensland, School of Economics

Abstract: In recent times there has been a sense that HIV/AIDS control has been attracting a significantly larger portion of donor health funding to the extent that it crowds out funding for other health concerns. Although there is no doubt that HIV/AIDS control attracts a larger proportion of development assistance for health (DAH) and that HIV/AIDS should be a DAH priority, whether HIV/AIDS is actually diverting funding away from other health concerns has yet to be analyzed fully. To fill this vacuum, this study aims to test if a higher level of HIV/AIDS funding is related to a displacement in funding for other health concerns, and if yes, to quantify the magnitude of the displacement effect. Specifically, we consider whether HIV/AIDS DAH has displaced i) TB, ii) malaria iii) health sector and ‘other’ DAH in terms of the dollar amount received for aid. We consider this question within a regression framework controlling for time and recipient heterogeneity. We find displacement effects for malaria and health sector but not TB. In particular, the displacement effect for malaria is large and worrying.

Date: 2011
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (5) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.uq.edu.au/economics/abstract/422.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Has HIV/AIDS displaced other health funding priorities? Evidence from a new dataset of development aid for health (2011) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:qld:uq2004:422

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Discussion Papers Series from University of Queensland, School of Economics Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by SOE IT ().

 
Page updated 2020-07-07
Handle: RePEc:qld:uq2004:422