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Can Turkish Recessions be Predicted?

Adrian Pagan ()

No 63, NCER Working Paper Series from National Centre for Econometric Research

Abstract: In response to the widespread criticism that macro-economists failed to predict the global recession coming from the GFC, we look at whether recessions in Turkey can be predicted. Because the growth in Turkish GDP is quite persistent one might expect this is possible. But it is the sign of GDP growth that needs to be forecast if we are to predict a recession, and this is made more difficult by the persistence in GDP growth. We build a small SVAR model of the Turkish economy that is motivated by New Keynesian models of the open economy, and find that using the variables entering it increases predictive success, although it is still the case that the predictive record is not good. Non-linear models for Turkish growth are then found to add little to predictive ability. Fundamentally, recession prediction requires one to forecast future shocks to the economy, and thus one needs some indicators of these. The paper explores a range of indicators for the Turkish economy, but none are particularly advantageous. Developing a bigger range of these indicators should be a priority for future Turkish macro-economic research.

Keywords: Business cycles; binary models; predicting recessions (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-ara, nep-cwa, nep-for and nep-mac
Date: 2010-10-10
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