EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Responses to Trade Opening: Evidence and Lessons from Asia

Devashish Mitra ()

No 913, ADBI Working Papers from Asian Development Bank Institute

Abstract: In various Asian countries, international trade has raised productivity, lowered markups through import competition (while increasing them through cheaper inputs that can be imported), raised wages, expanded employment, and, above all, reduced poverty. This is in sharp contrast to the impact of trade in some of the Latin American countries, which suggests exercising caution in extrapolating results to Asian countries that have not yet been studied. There are also a few adverse consequences of trade that have already been found for Asia. Apart from raising inequality, trade can increase informality, especially in the presence of labor-market rigidities. Additionally, there are the adverse effects stemming from trade adjustment as a result of worker mobility costs. In this context, this study discusses various policies that researchers have recommended.

Keywords: trade opening; worker mobility; trade adjustment; import competition (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: F10 F13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-int, nep-lma and nep-sea
Date: 2019-01-11
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/479926/adbi-wp913.pdf Full text (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Responses to Trade Opening: Evidence and Lessons from Asia (2019) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ris:adbiwp:0913

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in ADBI Working Papers from Asian Development Bank Institute Kasumigaseki Building 8F, 3-2-5, Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-6008, Japan. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ADB Institute ().

 
Page updated 2019-12-05
Handle: RePEc:ris:adbiwp:0913